Censorship is Censorship. Period.

February 3, 2017

I am deeply disturbed by the attacks on free speech aimed at Milo Yiannopolous, especially the outrageous situation at Berkeley (given its Free Speech history.)

Let’s be clear: I hate Milo Y’s ideas and I would be happy if he and all his followers dropped dead tomorrow. Personally I would never waste any time going anywhere to listen to him or his ilk speak and I certainly would not spend money on his upcoming book.

But if I have the power to shut down someone’s speech because I find it disturbing or dangerous, that guarantees that at some other time someone will have the power to shut down what I say for the same reason.

Suppression of ideas is a key component of fascism.  None of us can be free to express ourselves unless everyone has the right to express themselves whatever they want to say.

Anything else is self-serving and hypocritical.

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And Chaos Reigned …

February 3, 2017

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R.I.P. Nat Hentoff

January 7, 2017

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One of the important figures of our age, jazz critic and fierce defender of an absolutist First Amendment, columnist Nat Hentoff has died at 91.

The world is much less without him.


Whither Democracy?

November 8, 2016

Now, when people choose to chuckle about my anarchism, I just have to point out that their precious multi-billion dollar democracy has just raised a fascistic, female-abusing, racist con artist to the position of emperor of the world AND allowed his buddies to continue running both the House and the Senate.

Now that’s some bizarre politics!


I Oppose Proportional Representation

March 24, 2016

Pressure to change our electoral system from first-past-the-post to proportional representation grows immediately after each election. And it easy to see why those with a hierarchical bent complain.

  • In the last Federal election, the Liberals scored 40% of the vote but gained 54% of the seats, while the Greens took 3.4% of the vote and were rewarded with just 0.3% of the seats;
  • In 2011, the Tories achieved 40% of the vote and they too took 54% of the seats.  The Liberals, with 19% of the vote, received only 11% of the seats. In that year, though, the NDP got 30% of the vote but 33% of the seats.

Those in favour of proportional representation argue that the number of seats in the Federal parliament should be, more or less, equal to the proportion of votes received. The results under such a system would have been as follows:

  • 2015 (338 total seats):
    • LPC 135 seats (184 taken):
    • CPC 108 seats (99):
    • NDP 67 seats (44):
    • GPC  11 seats (1)

So long as one is not opposed to coalitions (which I certainly am not), these results — which could be repeated for all the elections  we have had — seem to cry out for proportional representation to make the system “fair”.  But wait. There is no such thing as a free lunch, so what are giving up to create “fairness” in a Federal parliament?

What we give up — and the key reason I oppose PR — is the right to choose our own local representative. And here’s why.  Under a Federal PR system, each party (party not electors) creates a list of 338 candidates (one for each available seat), numbered from 1 to 338.  When the votes are cast as in 2015, the top 40% of the Liberal list are declared elected, along with the top 32% of the Tory list, the top 20% of the NDP list, and the top 3.4% of the Green list.  Note that none — repeat NONE — of these candidates is attached to a riding.

It is probable that regional (or provincial) lists would be part of any PR system chosen. In other words, my vote in Vancouver East would be combined with all similar votes in the region or province, and seats are then allocated on the basis of the parties’ regional or provincial lists.  Still, once again, there is no local representation.

This is OK only if you believe the abstract Federal level is the most important. However, if you believe like me that true democracy is being able to choose the actual person you want to represent your neighbourhood, then your rights are stripped completely away by PR. Thus I oppose it.

The creation of party lists takes power away from the individual voter and puts it ALL into the hands of party executives; their friends and cronies will always appear at the top of the lists, and the risk of corruption (say, getting a high number on the list due to one’s wealth rather than one’s desire for public service or ability) will always be just around the corner. Thus I oppose it.

I believe that the first-past-the-post system (with all its faults) more closely matches local opinion to representation. I also believe that many of the issues with the current system would be resolved or mitigated by introducing a preferential voting system. In other words, no-one can be elected without achieving 50% of the vote in the riding. This would be achieved by allowing voters to label candidates with first and second preferences.  If a majority is not reached on a first ballot, the lowest vote getter is eliminated and his/her second choices are distributed. This continues until one candidate reached 50%+1.

So, let’s amend the current system to fix errors, but keep the fully local basis of election,


The Murder of Sacco & Vanzetti Remembered

August 23, 2015

This is the 88th anniversary of the murder by the State of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti.

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What from the splendid dead
We have inherited –
Furrows sweet to the grain, and the weed subdued –
See now the slug and the mildew plunder.
Evil does not overwhelm
The larkspur and the corn;
We have seen them go under.

Let us sit here, sit still,
Here in the sitting-room until we die;
At the step of Death on the walk, rise and go;
Leaving to our children’s children this beautiful doorway,
And this elm,
And a blighted earth to till
With a broken hoe.

— Edna St Vincent Millay “Justice Denied in Massachusetts”

Lest we forget.


Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

February 5, 2015

MaharishiThe hippy guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi died at his home in Holland on this date in 2008. He was 91 years old.

Looking back with perfect hindsight, it is clear he was an influential figure; not for what he was (an easy target of parody who allowed his PR to equate TM with drugs and exotic locales), but for the openness to novelty that was so perfectly epitomized by the Indian episodes of the Beatles and their clans. It somehow legitimized the tens of thousands of journeys that we now-boomers took on the world’s roads in those years, looking for whatever it was we were looking for. And, if nothing else, it gave our parents one more thing to laugh at and complain about.

May he enjoy the rest of his journey.