Free Art Studio: Opioid Crisis

March 19, 2018


Image: Philadelphia Balconies #2

March 19, 2018

Poem: Before Time

March 19, 2018


In a time

once upon a time

when time was fluid

and not restrained

by time zones

invented for train



in a time before

Columbus tripped over

the Americas,

before Marco Polo

invented China


in a time before

the pyramids

and writing

and agriculture

and fire


in a time before

dinosaurs and

the time before

the first fish

in a time before

the earth moved

when continents shifted

and mountains lifted


before the time

when green algae

was the top of the heap

before the time

when green algae

had an empire

wider than the Romans

or the British


before the time

when green algae

gripped both poles

with both hands

before the far away time

when green algae

grew from the heat

of the furnace

that the earth was still

and the under-earth was un-still

bubbling and oozing

through the ground


all the time


in a time before

asteroids banged the earth

in a regular beat

as a drum

keeps time

in a marching band


in a time before

the rocks fell

from the spinning disc of gas

to create the earth


before that time

maybe then

I didn’t love you


Image: Spring Canopy

March 17, 2018

Image: Blintzes

March 15, 2018

I Love Colour

March 14, 2018

I love colour. I try to show this is in my art work and photographs with varying degree of success. The always valuable Creative Report brings me news of a new book called “The Atlas of Rare and Familiar Colour” that really intrigues me.

The shelves of the Forbes Pigment Collection, based in Harvard University’s Art Museum buildings, are organised mostly by hue. The effect of this “curious chromatic ordering” ensures that the archive resembles “an installation exploring the very nature of painting”, as colour historian Victoria Finlay writes in the foreword to An Atlas of Rare & Familiar Colour, a new book that catalogues highlights from the collection. Published by Atelier Éditions, the Atlas features images by photographer Pascale Georgiev of a handful of the collection’s 2,500 rare pigments and examines their material composition, providence and application …

Violet de Cobalt

Many of the colours are rare and some are unlikely to be made ever again. Finlay writes that Indian Yellow, for example, originally came from the urine of cows that had been fed mango leaves, while Mummy Brown – as the name suggests – really was collected from the mummified bodies of ancient Egyptians (and was still available in London in the 1920s, courtesy of Roberson).

Wonderful stuff!



The Wonderbucks Building

March 13, 2018

In the last Changes On The Drive, I reported that the building at 1301 Commercial, which most of us these days know as the Wonderbucks Building, is  now for sale.  I’ve written a brief history of the building for the Grandview Heritage Group which you may find of interest.