Britannia Plaza Market

July 8, 2021

It is a great idea to have a sort of farmer’s market at Britannia. And it is on right now, today, until 7:00pm. Then they will be back for the following few Thursdays. Good stuff!


Housing On The Britannia Site

June 16, 2021

As regular readers will be aware, we have been discussing for a decade the possibility of putting low-income housing on the Britannia Community Centre site when it is renewed. There is a very clear division of opinion in the neighbourhood about whether housing should be on the site at all and, if there is to be housing, how many units can be accommodated.

As I say, we have been discussing this for about a decade and the City of Vancouver are now offering yet another chance for the public to give their opinion.

Whether you are for or against housing on the site, I hope as many residents as possible take the chance to share their views in this way


Britannia Renewal Meeting Tonight

June 1, 2021

Tonight at 6:00pm, Britannia is holding a Community Conversation tonight to report back on what they’ve heard during Renewal consultations.

There will also be an opportunity to offer your thoughts during small group discussions.

Join at: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89400480304?pwd=NHY4QWh5ek40d1VEN3MyZ1dtcmt1UT09%20%5bgoogle.com%5d#success

The Britannia Renewal project, along with the Safeway site redevelopment, is one of the two major planning concerns for Grandview over the medium term. These meetings are a way for you to stay in touch with decisions that have been, or are close to being, made about a significant community asset and the heart of our district.


GWAC Meeting on Britannia Housing

April 6, 2021

Britannia Update

November 9, 2020

As many of you will know, the future of Britannia is still in flux after years of meetings and workshops. Today, I received the following:

The Britannia Board is meeting on November 22 to discuss and decide on the Society priorities for 2021. 

Your feedback and insights are extremely important. Please complete the following survey by Friday, November 13 at Noon.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BoardPlanning2020

Regards, Britannia Board Development Committee

Please let them have your feedback on this most important Grandview resource.


Coming Soon — the Britannia Library!

July 3, 2020

It was announced today that Britannia will be one of the five branches that Vancouver Public Library system will re-open on July 14th. Hooray!

The other four are the Central Library, Kits, Renfrew, and South Hill; and several other branches will be opened for take-out service only.

It seems to have been a long time since March 16.


Britannia Renewal Update

February 13, 2020

For those who have been following the seemingly-endless Renewal process at Britannia, an RFP has now been released

“seeking professional architectural services required to implement the Britannia Renewal Master Plan that include rezoning the 18-acre integrated Britannia Community Services Centre, Britannia Secondary School, and Britannia Elementary Community School site (the “Site”), and preparing a detailed functional program for Building 1, which includes a swimming pool, recreation spaces, childcare, and non-market housing.”

Submission date is 12th March, but I am sure it will be a while before we hear who has won the bid.


Britannia Renewal — The Master Plan

April 14, 2018

Today, the Britannia Renewal Master Plan — or at least the consultants’ draft of it — was released at a Presentation and Open House display in Gym D at Britannia.  Today gave us a welcome break from days of rain, and there was a fairly good crowd of locals assembled for the presentation.

At the previous Open House, we were offered three concepts, and comments/suggestions were requested.  One of the concepts, the so-called Parker Street alignment (which I also voted for) was the clear favourite:

 

The consultants took these suggestions and preferences and have submitted a singular design for the Master Plan, based on the Parker concept:

 

In this plan, the heavy lifting for both major amenities and housing runs along the Parker Street edge of the site, and takes advantage of the slope — equivalent they said to six storeys — running east-west across the site.

The controversy for many is whether housing should be on the site at all, and if so, where should it be.  The consultants made it clear that housing on the site was a requirement received from the City, and that it should be above community amenities. This has created some design constraints, which they have tried to solve by placing the large community facilities in a block along Parker, with housing above. To get the  number of units required, they are relying on  the discretionary height in the IM zone along Venables which can go to 100 feet.

(Note that other areas of the site will be designed to match the maximum discretionary height of 6 storeys in the surrounding RM zones, and 4 storeys along Commercial).

 

The consultants were asked about the engineering required to put housing above facilities such as ice rinks, pools, and gyms that need wide clear spans without central supports.  They agreed that the engineering would be significantly more expensive. However, they believe that with the cost of land in the City, the additional engineering will still be less expensive that buying a similar size parcel of land nearby.

I am in a minority among friends and colleagues in supporting significant housing on the site.  I had three caveats: all the housing had to be public not market; no green space was to be sacrificed; and the housing units should not be too high.  The first two requirements have been met, and the third — the height — has still to be determined.  However, I assume they will go for the full 100 foot as discussed.  I would not care for that, but the need is so great that I would probably gnash my teeth while nodding in agreement.

Elizabeth Murphy  pointed out that, if the housing was not to go above the facilities, then 10 storeys would not be needed (the facilities — rink, pool, etc — will be at least two or three storeys in height by themselves).  Her preference is that the City buy enough land along the IM corridor of Venables to accomplish the same level of housing in smaller units.  That is a very reasonable position.  However, the cost of land would make that extremely expensive and, just as important to me, I would like to retain that industrial land for industries and employers to develop jobs.

We are to expect no more news until the Fall or Winter of 2018 when the rezoning discussion is set to begin. At that time, the massing and numbers of housing will be established.  I only hope that the serious debate about housing does not distract from all the other benefits we can receive from a thorough renewal of our most important public space.


GWAC: Transportation and Britannia Renewal

April 10, 2018

There was a another very interesting meeting at GWAC yesterday evening.

GWAC Director Craig Ollenberger gave a report on various transportation issues facing Grandview-Woodland.  These included:

  • the closure of 1st Avenue for two months this summer between Nanaimo and Clark; it was noted that pedestrians and bikes will still be allowed;
  • an extension of the MOBI bike rental service east to Victoria. It has not yet been announced where bike rental stations will be positioned in the neighbourhood;
  • a discussion about the possibility of mobility/congestion pricing for road use in Metro. Craig pointed out that as more vehicles use less gas, the government needs to replace the revenue from gas taxes;
  • there has been talk about improving pedestrian crossings, but few details yet;
  • a traffic study is being undertaken at the Triangle; this led to a spirited debate about the need for a much wider traffic study throughout the eastern half of the ‘hood, and the particular issues facing 7th and 8th avenues where accidents are occurring on a regular basis due to speeding through traffic. It was noted that a study should take place in view of the increased density planned for GW.  It was agreed that GWAC will assist residents to approach the City about these problems, using its previous experience in calming Napier and Victoria;

GWAC Secretary Susan Briggs reported on correspondence with Strathcona Residents Assoc (SRA) and others regarding noise  from the railways crossing our neighbourhoods. This has to do with the expansion of the Port of Vancouver. SRA seeks to have the project subject to the Provincial Environmental; Assessment process which is more stringent than the Federal process.  So far, the Provincial government’s position is that this is Federal jurisdiction and they have no power to intervene. GWAC will continue to monitor this issue.

Susan also reported on the growing number of GW lots being swept up in real estate/development assemblies, and complaints that GWAC has received from residents across the district.

This led to a vigorous discussion about the City’s Rate of Change policy and its failure to protect the vast pool of affordable rental suites in GW’s so-called “single family housing”.

There was also a discussion about the proposed housing project at 1st and Clark. It was agreed that the project should at the very least reflect the scale of surrounding buildings.

The second half of the meeting was a presentation by Executive Director Cynthia Low of the Britannia Community Services Centre.  She announced the public unveiling of the outside consultants’ Britannia Renewal Master Plan at an Open House this coming Saturday.   Two of the major issues still not determined are the type and number — if any — of housing on the Britannia site (something on which the City is insistent), and whether there should be one or two ice rinks.

The previous Open House had presented three concepts for renewing the site. The consultants have taken the public comments on each concept and will present a single idea this weekend, including massing and phasing plans.

Cynthia also announced that the Britannia Board will present its own response to the Master Plan, noting that the Board is just one of the partners in the project — along with the City, the School Board, the Library Board, and the Parks Board — each of whim has their own agendas and priorities. The Board wants to make sure that whatever changes come to Britannia, the site’s historic and highly successful inclusive and welcoming atmosphere is not damaged by new additions.

This was a very useful meeting, full of interesting and usable information. It showed how well GWAC can be a forum for neighbourhood discussion, and a dispersal point for information.  It was particularly good to see new members coming to their first meeting and participating actively.

 


The Future of Britannia: Open House

April 10, 2018

The next in a long series of Open Houses regarding the future of the Britannia Community site takes places this Saturday, 14th April, between noon and 4pm in Gym D.

This is an important meeting as it will coincide with the public release of the draft Master Plan for this most vital part of our community, which currently includes two schools, a library, several gyms, a swimming pool, an ice rink, a seniors’ centre, offices, and green space.

If you attended the last Open House about a month or so ago, you may recall that three different concepts were presented for the future of the site. The consultants have apparently taken the public comments from that display and will be presenting a single concept design.

Withe the publication of the Master Plan we are moving quickly to the end of this phase of the re-development. Several major issues — what kind, if any, of housing should be on the site, whether there should be one or two ice rinks, for example — still have to be ironed out, but these will be settled soon, and the project will move on next to rezoning and final consultations with the City, the School Board, Parks Board, and Library Board.

It is hard to express just how important Britannia is to the Grandview Woodland neighbourhood and I urge you to take a few minutes on Saturday afternoon to review these plans and make sure your views are known.


Britannia Renewal Update: GWAC

April 4, 2018

This month’s Grandview Woodland Area Council (GWAC) meeting will take the form of a presentation on Britannia Renewal and a report on transportation in Grandview.

“Ms. Cynthia Low, Britannia Community Centre Executive Director, will be addressing the meeting, providing an update on the plans and taking questions from the audience.

You might also be wondering what is going on with transportation planning for the Grandview Woodland neighbourhood. Craig Ollenberger will be reporting out on that subject at the upcoming public meeting, too.”

The meeting is on Monday 9th April at 7:00pm in the Learning Resource Centre, under the Britannia Library. Everyone is welcome.

GWAC’s email newsletter also provides a useful response to: “What does GWAC do?”

“Quite simply, GWAC identifies issues which herald change for our community. We educate members about these issues, share our collective point of view with Mayor and Council, and encourage and assist members to take action. The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods, an umbrella organization of which GWAC is a member, will assist with matters which affect all residents of Vancouver, such as blanket changes to zoning regulations.”


Spring Equinox at Britannia

March 15, 2018


Britannia Renewal: Open House

January 31, 2018


Britannia: Housing, Imagination & Purpose

September 30, 2017

Yet again, another Elizabeth Murphy opinion piece in yesterday’s Vancouver Sun has brought me to the keyboard. Yet again, she uses an attack on the revamping of Vancouver’s Community Association management agreements (an attack with which I agree in general terms) to push her negative and unimaginative opinions about the future of Britannia, a site that is irrelevant to, and outside the boundaries of, the power-grabbing centralising dispute disturbing other parks and recreational facilities in the City.

She writes as if allowing certain housing options on Britannia will guarantee a loss of some of the precious little green space that Grandview currently enjoys. Quoting Darlene Mazari, she claims that adding housing to Britannia will make the management structure too “complex.”  She declares that Britannia “is a fabulous model of combined services.”  I take issue with each of these points.

When it was constructed in the 1970s, there is is little argument that Britannia CCS was a progressive move forward in the delivery of services to Grandview. However, designed and constructed using the then-chic Pattern Language style it has long been recognised that Britannia is no longer fit for purpose; its buildings, working spaces, and interior connections form a barrier to the type of programming that Britannia wants to deliver to its 21st century clientele. I am certain that this failure was what drove the original impetus for a Britannia renewal in the first place; because it was no longer “a fabulous model.”

Created outside the standard model of Vancouver Community Associations, the management of the Britannia space has always been complex. It is governed by agreements between the Vancouver School Board, Vancouver Parks Board, and the Vancouver Library Board, and has a Board elected from the community.  Although this governance structure has presented challenges over the Brit’s existence, the form has proven to be both durable and workable. Adding a housing component will certainly expand the complexity but to believe this will collapse the governance model is an insult to the professionals (and residents) who will make it work.

The housing options I have discussed in previous posts assume that spaces/buildings can be multi-functional: Housing options can be developed above other required Brit facilities; above gyms, above the library, above programming spaces. In fact, I am a strong believer that the future of a land-poor Vancouver will not look well on us if we restrict ourselves to single-use properties in such developments. Given the number of buildings required at Britannia, I am certain we can place all the housing we want on site without the loss of any green space. Imagination and creativity can allow us to have our cake and eat it, too.

As regular readers will have noticed, I have now come to the conclusion that housing on the Brit site is both required and desired. However, I need to stress once again the three inviolable principles for this:  all housing on site must be government run for low income residents; all present green space is to be retailed; and a maximum height of four storeys must be maintained.

I know that even with these caveats, there will be lots of opposition from my heritage and development-activism colleagues, and I am sure I have already discouraged a number of them with my earlier ideas for densifying Grandview.   However, I am equally aware that the affordable housing crisis is genuine and needs to be faced directly with urgency and imagination.  I also know that a large number of individuals and groups within Grandview support the idea of on-site housing, including perhaps a majority of the Brit Planning & Development committee, I hope my ideas can be used as an input to a final conclusion.

Under doctor’s orders, I was unable to make either of last week’s Britannia meetings and I apologise if this post has fallen behind the times.


Housing At Britannia — Important Meeting

September 19, 2017

This coming Thursday, September 21st, there is a very important forum on the question of whether there should be housing on the re-developed Britannia Community Center site and, if so, what kind of housing should be contemplated there.

A week or so ago, Elizabeth Murphy wrote an opinion piece in the Sun that opposed housing of any kind on the site. This led to my own argument, more or less in favour of the idea with certain conditions, and a very spirited email exchange between a number of interested parties. Now, it is the broader community’s turn to have a say.

This particular debate about the future of a vital community resource is perhaps the most important we will have in this neighbourhood this decade, and I urge everyone interested in the future of Grandview to attend.

I would also urge that this debate be continued in the broadest possible sections of our community through public gatherings, email chains, and other means, rather than be delegated to a small and perhaps unrepresentative (though worthy) group who are able to attend certain committee meetings.

Finally, we must ensure that the decision on whether or not to include certain types of housing at Britannia be a genuinely community-wide decision, made by a plebiscite or some other form of all-resident participation.

In the meanwhile, I again urge everyone to attend this forum and make yourself heard.


Housing at Britannia?

September 11, 2017

Elizabeth Murphy has written another of her pieces in the Vancouver Sun. On this occasion, she is noting with horror the possibility of using public spaces, such as parks, to build housing in Vancouver.

I agree with many of the points she is making, including her thesis that the driving dynamic behind this movement is the desire to centralize, taking control from the locally based community centre associations, that was pushed forward so aggressively when Penny Ballem was City Manager. I also agree with her praise for new amenities that have been developed to include housing, such as the Strathcona and Mount Pleasant libraries.

However, when it comes to the redevelopment of Britannia, she has the history wrong and draws inaccurate conclusions from that faulty reading.  She blithely records that, during the development of the Britannia site in the 1970s that “housing was moved off the site.”  In fact, 77 houses were expropriated and demolished for the Community Center, many with barely grudging assent from the owners as recorded in Clare Shepansky’s definitive history of the removals. To this must be added 40 or 50 more that were torn down in the original building of Britannia School and the subsequent expansions in the 1950s primarily for playing fields.

It is entirely wrong to suggest, therefore, that the Britannia site has historically been a public asset. It was for many decades a thriving residential neighbourhood. The community could make a good and valid argument that we deserve to recover some of the housing that was lost to us in the 1970s, especially today when the need for affordable housing in Grandview is becoming acute.

It would seem to me that at this early stage where plans are not yet drawn up that we could take cues from the developments cited earlier in Strathcona and Mount Pleasant and possibly have the best of both worlds. The current green space could be preserved while a new library, gyms, pool, and schools could be designed with housing above (keeping, of course, to a maximum four-storey height). Let’s get creative!

I have not yet made up my mind whether I support the notion of housing as part of Britannia’s necessary and welcome redevelopment, but an inaccurate and revisionist history does a disservice to the people of Grandview and adds nothing to the debate.


GWAC, Britannia, and Reconciliation

March 28, 2017

Next Monday evening, in lieu of their regular monthly meeting, GWAC is encouraging its members to attend a presentation on “Reconciliation & Renewal”, given by Yvonne Rigsby-Jones from Reconciliation Canada.

The meeting takes place:

Monday April 3rd, 2017, 

6:00pm:  Community meal

7:00-8:00pm: meeting and discussion

Britannia Community Services Centre, Gym D

 

To quote the GWAC notice:

How can the Britannia Renewal project inspire positive change and engage community members in dialogue and transformative experiences that revitalize the relationships among Indigenous peoples and all Canadians?

The new 2017 GWAC Board of Directors will be there and they welcome your views and comments,

 


Open House at Britannia

February 27, 2017

This coming Saturday, March 4th, between noon and 4:00pm, the folks who are working on the Britannia Renewal project are holding an Open House and Ideas Fest.  They want you to see the groundwork they have laid for the project and to actively solicit your ideas and feedback.

The updating of the Britannia site is almost certainly the most important project our neighbourhood will undertake this generation. The site contains two schools, gyms, a swimming pool, a library, facilities for seniors and childcare, playing fields, offices, and community spaces; it is the very heart of Grandview and changes there will affect us all in one way or another.

I hope many of you attend and make sure your voice, your opinion, is heard. This really is important.


Next Date For Britannia

January 19, 2017

The first meeting of the new year for the Britannia Renewal Project takes place on Tuesday 24th January in the Info Boardroom, Napier Street, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm.

This will be chance to meet with the various project consulting partners — Urban Arts Architecture, Diamond Schmidt, EcoPlan, Space 2 Place, and Integral.

The meeting will also look at an update to the Renewal Visioning, a review of Britannia Management Priorities, and further discussion on Draft Land Use Principles.

Should be of interest to all who are concerned for the future of this massive community resource.

 


Britannia Renewal Meeting

November 16, 2016

There was a very useful meeting last night, open to the public, of the Britannia Planning Committee which is helping to manage the renewal process for the Britannia Community Services site, perhaps the very heart of Grandview. There were some 40+ people there and some useful information was given and taken.

britannia-renewal-map-outline-1

Suzanne Dahlin, chair of the Committee, reminded us that the Britannia renewal project is more than ten years old at this point but now, with the approval by public referendum of the dollars required, the project is moving into a whole new realm of activity. She also made clear that Britannia — with its joint ownership by Britannia Community Services, the Vancouver School Board, the Vancouver Library Board, and some staff working for Vancouver Parks Board — is a unique challenge. She also noted that the pool and the ice rink are considered “regional” facilities, shared with Strathcona and DTES.

The most current news is that, as a result of an RFP issued this summer, the City has hired UrbanArts to be the lead consultants for the next phase of the project. This will include the public engagement section, along with planning for programming and land use. UrbanArts sub-contractors for Britannia are Diamond Scmitt Architects, Integranl for “sustainable infrastructure,” Space2Space who will be looking at the design of the public realm, and Studio Parsons handling public engagement. Their contract takes them up to the point where the Master Plan is agreed, scheduled for December 2017, and an architect will need to be hired to complete and build the project.

Suzanne reminded us that we are not at the “bricks and mortar”stage yet and that we are still dealing with “principles”. She also noted that work will begin this week and so there is nothing yet to report. She noted that the newly-designed website for the Planning Committee will be constantly updated, especially with the documents that are created as the process unfolds.

The “public engagement process” is only broadly-defined at this point, with no details. There were concerns expressed that we should ensure that community leaders, First Nations, Inuit, and Meti peoples, the very poor, and the homeless are included in both the discussions and the decisions. Cynthia Low stressed that we need to be pro-active in approaching these groups, not just wait and hope they approach us.

The meeting then turned to the very important issue of creating and approving Land Use Principles that will govern the design and the actualisation of the Renewal project. It was noted by many with great disdain that the Grandview Community Plan had presupposed social housing on the Britannia site, something that has certainly not been through any public consultation process or agreement. A major reason for creating Principles is to stop this kind of presupposition.  The Committee has drafted eight such Principles and they were put to the meeting for discussion (the Principles are more defined than set out below which only tries to capture the essence of the point).

  1. To retain or expand available green space;
  2. To maintain existing public views of the moumtains and downtown;
  3. To retain and revitalize the heritage parts of Britannia HS;
  4. To ensure that all future partnerships for the site are fully public and transparent, and have been through the public engagement process for the Renewal Project;
  5. To ensure that any and all land swaps and similar ownership deals concerning Britannia lands be fully public and transparent, and have been through the public engagement process for the Renewal Project;
  6. That the entire 18 acre site be retailed for public use;
  7. That the new Britannia should be designed to meet the growing needs of the Grandview community;
  8. That funding for the project should NOT be reliant on CACs and similar mechanisms for density beyond that agreed to in the Community Plan.

The only Principles that ran into some opposition at the meeting were numbers 4 and 5 where some people wanted to soften the restrictions on the City doing stuff outside the Principles and the public engagement process.  However, the majority of speakers agreed that the transparency of the public engagement process was a paramount concern.

It was noted that the end that the Principles will need to be debated with and agreed by all the partners at Britannia (City, VSB, VPB, VLB, etc) and so we should expect some changes to be coming down the pike.

It was a good information-rich meeting and I encourage everyone interested in this vital piece of our community renewal to become engaged in this important exercise.