Slow Streets

September 7, 2020

Some of Grandview’s streets are part of a small network called slow streets where traffic calming measures are in place to encourage walking and cycling.

City Council has asked staff to reallocate up to 11 per cent of Vancouver roadways for things like slow streets; therefore, the City of Vancouver wants to hear from residents about this initiative.

They would like residents to complete the slow streets survey.

“We’re trying to get feedback on them, kind of how they’re going, what they’re seeing out on the streets, are they working for them, are there improvements they’d like to see?” said Paul Storer, director of transportation for Vancouver. “Did we miss some streets that really should be identified? That’s going to inform some of what comes next.”

Storer said the biggest complaint about the slow streets so far is that there is still too much vehicle traffic on them. This month staff will add more signs and barriers to try to further reduce traffic.


Image: Pathway In Fall

September 7, 2020


Grandview 7th September 1920

September 7, 2020

Province, 19200907, p.17

All previous Grandview 1920 clippings


Poem: Magnetic North

September 7, 2020

 

 

You are magnetic north;

All my paths converge on you.

 

You are the tropics;

my Cancer and my Capricorn.

 

You are the forests;

the leafy groves where my dreams dwell.

 

You are the mountains,

with heights I could not imagine.

 

You are the seven seas;

I bob on your waves and tides.

 

You are the equator;

the widest part of my existence.

You are my world.

 


Labour Is More Important Than Capital

September 7, 2020

It is good to remember words of wisdom from long ago:

“[T]here is one point, with its connections, not so hackneyed as most others, to which I ask a brief attention. It is the effort to place capital on an equal footing with, if not above, labor in the structure of government. It is assumed that labor is available only in connection with capital; that nobody labors unless somebody else, owning capital, somehow by the use of it induces him to labor. This assumed, it is next considered whether it is best that capital shall hire laborers, and thus induce them to work by their own consent, or buy them and drive them to it without their consent. Having proceeded so far, it is naturally concluded that all laborers are either hired laborers or what we call slaves. And further, it is assumed that whoever is once a hired laborer is fixed in that condition for life.

Now there is no such relation between capital and labor as assumed, nor is there any such thing as a free man being fixed for life in the condition of a hired laborer. Both these assumptions are false, and all inferences from them are groundless.

Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.”

— Abraham Lincoln, State of the Union Speech, 3rd December 1861.