Just Say No

BC Premier Christie Clark is getting a lot of press for walking out of the Premiers’ discussions on a national energy policy while her concerns about the Northern Gateway pipeline are unsatisfied.  She is getting castigated in the eastern press (and I include Alberta and Saskatchewan in that description) for being anti-Canadian, while a bunch of local right-of-centrists on Twitter are cheering her on.

I think she is still on the wrong side of the fence.  As I understand the bottom line of her concerns, she will approve the pipeline if BC makes more money from the deal.  That’s a dead wrong position and can only lead to the eventual approval for the project if Alberta wakes up, smells the coffee, and opens up their cheque book.

The NDP, most interior First Nations and, I believe, the majority of the BC population just want to say no.  We don’t need the pipeline, we don’t need the crude oil, we don’t need the risk.  There is no amount of money in the world that could pay for the damage a big spill in our north or on our coast could cause.

Andrew Coyne and other Easterners have suggested that, in the end, the Feds could legally force us to have the pipeline.  If they think that Clark’s intransigence today is harming Canada, they should see what might happen if the people of BC are over-ridden on this by Ottawa!

 

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One Response to Just Say No

  1. Anonymous says:

    Well said, Jak!

    With her irresponsible political posturing, our premier is desperately trying to temporarily de-rail discussions about the important need for a national renewable energy strategy. Instead, she’s trying to ‘sell’ her nod of approval for the Enbridge Northern Gateway project.

    The proposed Enbridge project threatens to produce a multitude of small-scale environmental problems as well as potential large-scale devastation from a major oil spill from the pipelines or oil supertankers. The ‘safeguards’ that Enbridge argues will minimize the risk of oil spills and the efficacy of their ‘clean-up strategies’ are questionable. They do not allay concern about the serious cumulative impacts of oil-spills which would very likely occur due to various technological problems, human errors and unpredictable events such as earthquakes.

    Our First Nations communities are in a particularly vulnerable situation when it comes to any further deterioration of our region’s lands and waters. The vast Gateway project would have disastrous consequences on the culture and livelihood of many First Nations citizens. Furthermore, confrontational tactics imposed by Enbridge during their ‘consultations’ with First Nations communities confuses and harms relationships and may jeopardize Aboriginal treaty negotiations.

    As you say so well, “The NDP, most interior First Nations and, I believe, the majority of the BC population just want to say no. We don’t need the pipeline, we don’t need the crude oil, we don’t need the risk. There is no amount of money in the world that could pay for the damage a big spill in our north or on our coast could cause.”

    The bottom line is that the Enbridge proposal has unacceptably large long-term risks that outweigh the possibility of any relatively small short-term benefits.

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